If you're interested in submitting a Letter to the Editor, click here.

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

In "Dereliction of Duty," national security adviser H.R. McMaster was writing about military leaders' failure to stand up to presidents who insisted on pursuing an unwinnable war. Now he is in the news — and apparently in the presidential doghouse — for stating the obvious: that evidence of …

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

Don't tell me the issue is mental health. Save the nonsense about "good guys" with weapons somehow being the answer. The truth is this: There would have been no tragic shooting last week in Parkland, Florida, if a troubled young man had not gotten his hands on a military-style assault rifle …

  • George Will
  • ()

Recent history does not suggest that America has such a surplus of presidential talent that it can afford to spurn an audition by a mayor, Eric Garcetti, who governs where over 40 percent of waterborne imports enter the country — through the LA and Long Beach ports.

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

There is a war that has lasted longer than the one in Afghanistan. It is the so-called "war on poverty," launched by President Lyndon Johnson during his State of the Union address on Jan. 8, 1964.

  • George Will
  • ()

Recent history does not suggest that America has such a surplus of presidential talent that it can afford to spurn an audition by a mayor, Eric Garcetti, who governs where over 40 percent of waterborne imports enter the country — through the LA and Long Beach ports.

  • Star Parker
  • ()

I have long been in favor of reforming Social Security by changing it to a system of personally owned retirement accounts. Instead of paying a payroll tax, with the U.S. government telling you what you'll get when you retire, you take ownership of that money — the payroll tax — and invest in…

  • George Will
  • ()

Time was, infrastructure — roads, especially — was a preoccupation of populists, who were mostly rural and needed roads to get products to market, and for travel to neighbors and towns, which assuaged loneliness. Today, there is no comparably sympathetic constituency clamoring for "internal …

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

In "Hamlet," Shakespeare pens one of the most familiar lines — and best advice — ever written. Before Laertes leaves for Paris, his father, Polonius, tells him: "Neither a borrower nor a lender be... ." We have ignored that advice for far too long, which is why the U.S. national debt is $20 …

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

Look at the picture. The woman's eye socket is the sickly green-yellow of a healing bruise. The picture shows Colbie Holderness, one of two ex-wives who have accused former senior White House aide Rob Porter of physically abusing them. Porter, in the statement announcing his resignation on F…

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

Well, of course the president who claimed bone spurs to dodge the Vietnam War wants the biggest, bestest military parade ever, with lots of tanks and rockets and flags — zillions of flags — and fighter jets screaming overhead. Why is anyone surprised?

  • George Will
  • ()

Even if, inexplicably, you occasionally think about things other than major league baseball, consider this: Why are many premier free agents, particularly sluggers and starting pitchers, unsigned even while we are hearing the loveliest four words, "Pitchers and catchers report"?

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

There it was, in President Trump's State of the Union address: "As America regains its strength, opportunity must be extended to all citizens. That is why this year we will embark on reforming our prisons, to help former inmates who have served their time get a second chance at life."

  • Jackie Cushman
  • ()

In a world that often feels tumultuous and erratic, it's helpful to step back and realize that change is the only constant, whether in personal life or the life of a nation. To weather the storm, look to the horizon to gain perspective and thereby peace.

  • George Will
  • ()

When next you shoehorn yourself into one of America's ever-shrinking airline seats, you might encounter a new wrinkle in the romance of air travel. You might be amused, or not, to discover a midsize — say, 7-feet long — boa constrictor named Oscar coiled contentedly, or so you hope, in the s…

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

A memo released Feb. 2 by the Republican majority on the House Intelligence Committee alleges, in the words of a Wall Street Journal editorial, that: "the FBI and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court appear to have been used to influence the 2016 election and its aftermath." If true, …

  • George Will
  • ()

In 1930, John Maynard Keynes was worried, but not about the unpleasantness that had begun the previous year and would linger long enough to become known as the Great Depression. What troubled the British economist was that humanity "is solving its economic problem."

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

President Trump's first State of the Union address set a new standard. For himself. If he lives up to that standard in future speeches, he may go far in changing his image from a blustering, ad-libbing "entertainer," to someone who looks and sounds — shall I say it? — more "presidential."

  • Laura Hollis
  • ()

The president's State of the Union address is never much fun for the party whose candidate is not the occupant of the White House. So it's to be expected that the nonpresidential party would be less than thrilled. That said, President Trump's first State of the Union was striking — not only …

  • George Will
  • ()

Frederick Douglass, born on a Maryland plantation 200 years ago this month, later in life picked the 14th, the middle of the month, as his birthday. This February, remember him, the first African-American to attain historic stature.

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

There are two ways to interpret the reports that President Trump ordered the firing of special counsel Robert Mueller last June and backed down only after his White House counsel threatened to resign. The first is with guarded optimism. The second is with dreadful foreboding.

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

Wait, back up a minute. We just zoomed past a story that would have been a five-alarm scandal for any other administration, with weeks of screaming front-page headlines: "The President and the Porn Star."

  • George Will
  • ()

The Trump administration last week acted to stanch the flood of foreign-made washing machines that are being imported because Americans want them. The stanching will be accomplished by quotas and stiff (up to 50 percent) tariffs, which are taxes collected at the border and paid by American c…

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

One reason Democrats seem so fixated on importing illegal immigrants and allowing their children to stay and become citizens may be the exodus from high-tax and traditionally Democratic states. Anecdotal evidence is usually not helpful in determining trends, but when stories begin to accumul…

  • George Will
  • ()

Research at the Rand Corp. suggests that the public's mental bandwidth is being stressed by today's torrent of information pouring from the internet, social media, cable television and talk radio, all of which might be producing — partly because the media's audience has difficulty sorting fa…

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

Even for those of us who braced for catastrophe, the first year of Donald Trump's presidency was worse than expected — more divisive, mean-spirited, erratic, unhinged, incompetent and egomaniacal than could have been imagined. 

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

The rude, petulant man-child in the Oval Office is reeling ever more wildly out of control, and those who cynically or slavishly pretend otherwise are doing a grave disservice to the nation — and to themselves.

  • George Will
  • ()

In 1790, the finest mind in the First Congress, and of his generation, addressed in the House of Representatives the immigration issue: "It is no doubt very desirable that we should hold out as many inducements as possible for the worthy part of mankind to come and settle amongst us."

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

As has occurred many times before, congressional Democrats threatened a government shutdown — this time to force President Trump and Republicans to cave on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, an American immigration policy that grants eligible immigrant youth, who entered the country as …

  • Laura Hollis
  • ()

U.S. Sen. Cory Booker loudly professed shock and indignation at the allegations that President Donald Trump had referred to certain countries as shitholes. Booker claimed to have shed "tears of rage" when fellow Sen. Dick Durbin called to tell him about the incident. This is nothing but crav…

  • George Will
  • ()

Is there anything more depressing than a cheerful liberal? The question is prompted by one such, historian David Goldfield, who has written a large-hearted book explaining that America's problems would yield to government's deft ameliorating touch if Americans would just rekindle their enthu…

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

At $3.14 trillion, China holds the world's largest foreign exchange reserves. It is also the largest underwriter of U.S. debt. Financial experts and political observers have long worried that becoming financially dependent on an unfriendly and rival nation is not good for the U.S. in the long term.

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

The past week of the Trump presidency felt like that point in a video game when you've reached a new level and the widgets suddenly start flying at you too fast to dodge. There was an attack on free speech. On an independent judiciary. And with the president's horrific reference to "shithole…

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

If you want to know President Trump's position on any given policy issue, the last person you should ask is President Trump. He has no idea what he thinks. Let me amend that. In terms of racism, he's crystal clear. On most other things, though, he's fuzzy to the point of cluelessness.

  • George Will
  • ()

On Jan. 1, by the grace of God — or of the government, which is pretty much the same thing to progressives — a sliver of a right was granted to Oregonians: Henceforth they can pump gas into their cars and trucks, all by themselves. But only in counties with populations of less than 40,000.

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

This concept of an outside deliverer has reappeared in American culture from time to time, most notably through superheroes like Superman, Batman, Wonder Woman and the Force in the "Star Wars" saga. It has also invaded politics, most notably with Barack Obama, on whom his devoted disciples, …

  • George Will
  • ()

Richard V. Reeves says that colleges and universities, partly because of the complexity of the admission process, are "perpetuating class divisions across generations" as America develops what The Economist calls a "hereditary meritocracy." It is, however, difficult to see how something like…

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

Having lost an election they thought they would win, and unable to get over it, the left has taken refuge in the only shelter available to them: The president is off his rocker, mad, crazy, unstable and therefore the 25th Amendment must be invoked and Trump removed from office.

  • Eugene Robinson
  • ()

I confess to having paid less attention than I should to the increasingly apocalyptic rhetoric from the administration about the nuclear threat from North Korea. I'm not talking about President Trump's juvenile tweets calling Kim Jong Un "Little Rocket Man" and making fun of his weight. I me…

  • George Will
  • ()

It is almost a law of our political physics: Those who choose to leave Congress thereby demonstrate qualities that make one wish they would linger longer. After seven terms in the House of Representatives, which followed eight years in Pennsylvania's House of Representatives and six in the s…

  • Cal Thomas
  • ()

In an end-of-year column titled "Why I'm Still a Never Trumper," New York Times columnist Bret Stephens lists the accomplishments of the Trump administration. It is a record that should delight any conservative voter, but despite it all, and with promises of more to come this year, Stephens …

  • Walter E. Williams
  • ()

We are a nation of 325 million people. We have a bit of control over the behavior of our 535 elected representatives in Congress, the president and the vice president. But there are seven unelected people who have life-and-death control over our economy and hence our lives — the seven govern…

  • George Will
  • ()

The federal debt held by the public was 39 percent of GDP 10 years ago; it is 75 percent today. No one knows at what percentage the debt's deleterious effect on economic growth becomes severe. We will discover that point the hard way, unless Congress sends to the states for prompt ratificati…

  • Ruth Marcus
  • ()

As an appalling year limped to a close, with President Trump consistently underperforming even the lowest of expectations, we can be cheered by this: Our country's institutions and values have, so far, proven remarkably resilient.