Every homeowner wants a nice green lawn. Attaining one can come 
at the expense of your city’s water supply, which is why many utilities in 
the country regularly put bans on lawn watering during periods of drought.

Some municipalities in California, for example, have enacted restrictions on watering yards and gardens during specific times of the day. Evaporation on a hot summer day occurs most rapidly during the afternoon hours and can lead to increased water loss.

Refraining from watering your plants in the middle of the day can be a challenge to a homeowner trying to keep a perfect lawn, but the law is the law. According to the Environmental Protection Agency, turf grass generally needs less than 1 inch of water per week. Using more than this can lead to plant diseases and weed growth, so limited watering has a two-fold benefit: your lawn’s health and the overall health of the environment. 

Best Watering Times

According to the Regional Water Providers Consortium, you should water your garden or landscape before 10 a.m. or after 6 p.m. when temperatures are cooler and the air is calmer.

The organization recommends watering your landscape twice a week. This thorough yet infrequent schedule will help your grass roots go deeper, which can result in more water-efficient, drought-tolerant plants, according to the consortium. 

Watering Methods

There are many different options at your disposal when it comes to methods for watering your lawn or outdoor plants. Portable and stationary sprinklers offer great lawn coverage, depending on the size of your yard. Sprinklers also come in rotary varieties intended for circular watering zones, such as flower beds or unique garden shapes.

Irrigation systems give homeowners more seamless control over their lawn watering schedule, providing timer-controlled usage that can be effective at maximizing efficiency. You can easily program an automatic watering schedule for specific times. These systems are highly recommended by the Environmental Protection Agency, which estimates that homeowners using them can reduce irrigation water use by 8,800 gallons of water per year.

Every homeowner wants a nice green lawn. Attaining one can come 
at the expense of your city’s water supply, which is why many utilities in 
the country 

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